Granada Details

 

Granada Modern History

 

 

 

In another chapter on the impact on Grenada, Gibson describes the breakdown of the national uprising and the newspaper articles that detailed it from July 18 to July 23.

In the Granada cemetery records for the years 1936 to 1939, the names of 2137 were shot. This figure is based on data from the Statistical Yearbook of Ireland 1943 and the Review of Statistics in the province of Granada in the year 1956 and also matches the annual distributions. This confirms the reliability of these statistics.

Since the triumph of Nations Uprising in Granada, power was divided between the Military Governor, the Civil Governor, the provincial head of the anti-Franco resistance movement, and the bishop of the diocese. At his suggestion, the Minister of Interior appointed mayors and stopped conveniently according to reports issued by them.

Among the mayors elected by them out for Gallego Burin, alderman of the early days of Franco's for 13 years, and Sola Rodriguez-Bolivar, who remained in office for 15 years.

In 1970 there was a building fire that caused three fatalities. A report endorsed a monument that was erected in La Caleta.

Tension in Spain increased during the spring of 1970 and early summer and reached its climax with the building fire, Granada, and the metro in Madrid. On July 21 in Grenada, the police opened fire on 2000 construction workers, killing three and wounding six.

Movement of the press immediately launched an attack against and charged the clergy of Granada. On July 28 Escuin Benavent, Archbishop of Granada, thought of as conservative, issued a pastoral letter in which he condemned police brutality and defended the construction workers’ strike to the priests involved.

ETA has committed several terrorist attacks, including the nine killed in October 2000 and the Prosecutor of the High Court of Justice of Andalusia, Luis Portero. These murders shocked the public and led to demonstrations against ETA terrorism.

Civil War and Franco

The Civil War in Granada was greatly influenced by the murder that took place of the poet Federico Garcia Lorca on August 19, 1936, on the outskirts of the city of Granada by national militia, after having spent several days in government custody.

He was only one death resulting from the Spanish Civil War, but the quality of the person killed and the circumstances that attended the event has ended by becoming a symbol.

The historian Ian Gibson described in the book The Repression of Nationalist Granada and the Death of Federico Garcia Lorca the election results of February 1936, in Spain, the Granada events of March 10, the tension in relations between various civil governors taking place this spring tragic, the cancelation of parliamentary elections in the province of Granada, the replacement of the council in October 1934 that dismissed the conspiracy and nationalist.

 

 

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November 6, 1982, Pope John Paul II visited the city of Granada to attend a mass in the homily of Poligono Almanjayar.

In the ’90s communications were improved, with highways Almeria, Jaen, Malaga, and Seville to provide outlets for Madrid and Levante.

The Science Park opened in May 1995, the first interactive museum in southern Spain. This museum shows a playful approach to the scientific culture, and during the school year, thousands of schools visit.

Democracy

It has been the headquarters of the Royal Chancellery since 1587 and currently houses the High Court of Justice of Andalusia.

The first democratic municipal elections were held in Spain on April 3, 1979, and four political parties won representation in Granada: UCD, PSOE, PCE, and PSA—none got enough votes to govern—and allied PSOE, PCE, and PSA appointed socialist mayor Antonio Jara Andreu full municipal councilor elect.

In 1989 the headquarters of the High Court of Justice of Andalusia was built in the city of Granada, although some of its rooms are located in Seville and Malaga.